Going from Rags to Rabbits

Looking for a sweet Easter treat that isn’t loaded with sugar? Try making adorable bunnies from plain white washcloths. These bunnies make neat basket stuffers for children, small surprises for the elderly, or place card holders for your sit-down holiday meal. This project is fun, easy and perfect for crafty Grandmas, working with children over 7 years of age.

Rabbit meeting

Rabbit meeting

Assemble your materials in advance. You’ll need white washcloths, available in packets of 10 at most bath and bed stores. You’ll also need white string or heavy, white cotton thread, some googly eyes and small pompom balls for tails. I recommend using Sobo Premium Craft and Fabric Glue and Scribbles Fabric Paint.

1. Place one washcloth on a flat, clean surface. Roll the washcloth from opposing corners, rolling from tips to center.

2. Fold the rolled washcloth over hand.

Step 1. Roll the cloth

Step 1. Roll the cloth

Step 2. Fold the cloth

Step 2. Fold the cloth

3. Using cotton thread, tightly wrap folded washcloth five times, then tie off.

4. Fold front panels backwards, creating a “face” with protruding ears. Again using cotton thread, tightly wrap the section between the face and ears. Wind five times, tie off, and leave the long threads hanging.

Step 3. Tie the cloth

Step 3. Tie the cloth

Step 4. Face and ears!

Step 4. Face and ears!

5. Using a needle and the remaining hanging thread, create whiskers and trim. Use glue to attach the googly eyes.

6. A generous dot of glue in back, with a pompom, makes a fluffy tail.

7. A carefully dropped, generous "drip" of Scribbles fabric paint makes a perfect bunny’s nose.

Step 5. I can see!

Step 5. I can see!

Step 6. Does this tail make my butt look big?

Step 6. Does this tail make my butt look big?

Step 7. What's that smell?

Step 7. What's that smell?

8. Glue a sprig of artificial spring flowers deep into the interior loop of the bunny.

9. Allow glued bunnies to dry, overnight. They may have one last hurrah, together, before distribution!

Step 8. I feel pretty!

Step 8. I feel pretty!

Step 9. Nice meeting you all...

Step 9. Nice meeting you all...

Doll Heads + Succulent Plants = Awesome

I collect objects that feel orphaned in some way; old dolls have become a special weakness.  But what to do with them, once adopted? Discard those nasty cloth bodies, repurpose the doll’s head, and voila! You now have a punk-looking new home for a baby succulent plant. Wouldn't this make a great housewarming gift? Nothing says "Welcome to the neighborhood!" like a baby head with plants for brains...

Begin by setting the (newly decapitated) doll head on a level countertop. In pen, draw a line around the top of the scalp. Make sure this line is even – and runs parallel to the countertop. Using a carpet knife, carefully cut along and below the pen line. Remove the top of the doll head.

With the same carpet knife, cut a notch in the back of the head base. This will provide drainage. Using any waterproof adhesive, apply a circle around the base of the doll head. Place the head in a small ceramic dish and press gently. Allow for drying, overnight.

Place gravel in the base of the doll head, then fill to the brim with potting soil. Plant up to three small succulents in your new planter.  Keep the plant in a sunny location (perhaps in a window facing your neighbors) and give it distilled water once weekly.

Creepy can be good!

Shooting Geeks for Oni Press at ECCC

I had the privilege of photographing a ton of happy people for Oni Press (Scott Pilgrim) and Comics Alliance at their joint kickoff event for this year's Emerald City Comic Con. I teamed up with my buddy Ed Peterson for this shoot, and we had a blast doing it. As the night revved up it was easier for us to convince people to take to the air, supplying all concerned with great visuals. Thanks, everyone, and thanks for the mention, Comics Alliance!

Airborne geeks

To see the whole set of photos, head on over to Oni Press' Facebook page.

Before Donating Your Artwork...

In this thoughtful article, Seattle painter Kate Vrijmoet addresses a growing dilemma. She joins a chorus of those who've dared to illuminate the darker underside of fundraisers/art auctions. Here, she outlines how artists' donations can actually put the loftier cause and the artists' own careers at cross-purposes. See what she offers as alternatives to this conflicting paradigm. The article is worth the read, as are the comments and responses.

Seattle artists are noted for their generosity. Could their contributions be put to better use?

Lots of stuff, not enough wall? Hang it salon-style

Wouldn't it be swell if you could exhibit more of your cool stuff without pockmarking your walls with a Tommy gun's worth of holes just to figure out how to make it all fit?

Salon-style, in which art is hung vertically in a kind of Tetris configuration, solves half the problem. But what about those holes? Here's how to proceed:

 

The wall, ready and waiting

 

1. Measure the length and width of the area in which you'll be displaying your art, and mark that same area on your floor with blue painter's tape.

2. Gather up a nice variety of art. If you have a cat, grab him also; cats have marvelous eyes for detail.

 

Junior the cat says "yellow wall, yellow art"

 

4. When you've got it all figured out, all you need to do is transfer your composition to the wall. Take your time, measure carefully, and use a level. If you've got to set it aside for a bit, take a picture of your arrangement for later. Plus, cats like to have their picture taken.

Super-special tip: to keep your art straight after you hang it, press a ball of museum putty to the back of the piece, then push. no more crooked pictures...

 
 

Congratulations on your masterpiece! And the next time you invite a bunch of people over to sip wine and stare knowingly at your wall, remember: salon-style!